A Series of Pilots

Tell Your StorySome people have asked me why I’m writing novelettes and novellas and not novels. My response: I am. Sort of.

So, I will explain in the following five points…

1. I like the Format

I like novelettes and novellas. Some of my favorite stories are too short to be considered novels, and thus fall into this category. For example, Jack London’s “The Call of the Wild” is a novella. And let us not forget Robert Silverberg, an award-winning SF writer who has excelled at these lengths with stories like “Sailing to Byzantium” and many others.

The Hugo Awards define a novelette as a story of greater than 7500 and less than 17,500 words; and a novella as greater than 17,500 and less than 40,000 words. Since most non-writers don’t think in terms of word count, a novelette is roughly 30-70 pages, while a novella is roughly 71-160 pages. Back in the sixties and seventies, lots of books were published that would now count as novellas. Then came the the rise of “The Big Book,” which led to the bestseller-driven approach followed by today’s traditional publishers, and the smaller books just disappeared.

2. Viability

Ebooks and print-on-demand services have made novelettes and novellas viable again. For busy people, like me and many others, it’s easier to carve out the time to read a shorter-length works than some massive tome. There are other advantages to these shorter-length works, as well. The stories tend to be the length they need to be, so there’s no padding and no extraneous subplots. They’re long enough for complex story lines, but not so long that readers get bogged down.

3. Multi-Tasking

I have so many ideas for stories in my head, ideas that have been bottled up for so long that they’re all clamoring to get out. If I worked on a mammoth project like a novel, I’d have to concentrate for an extended period of time on just the novel. Since my day job is all about multi-tasking, it just feels more normal for me to round-robin across my various projects.

By multi-tasking, I mean that I tend to work on up to eight projects at the same time. There’s a cost, of course, because each project takes longer in terms of calendar time. But, then again, there’s always new work coming out of my “story pipeline.” And my writing groups have gotten used to me bringing chapters from different stories to be critiqued in successive weeks.

Um, note that I don’t recommend this approach for most people, but it works for me.

4. Marketing

My pipeline of shorter works fits into the marketing approach I’ve chosen for indie publishing. Assuming a quality product as a baseline, then to some extent the amount of money that a writer can make is predicated on the number of products that they have. New products (and sales) tend to boost the sales of older, related products. This is the approach used by well-known indie writers Kristine Kathryn Rusch and her husband, Dean Wesley Smith.

5. The Pilot Approach

In my stories I’ve tried to emulate some of the television shows that I like. Shows where a season is really a novel, composed of individual episodes. One of the most famous indie-published books, Wool by Hugh Howey, was originally published in five parts.

In some sense, you can look at most of my novelettes and novellas as pilot episodes for different TV series. Right now, the series are:

  • Belters: In the 24th century, Jonas Kastle is a troubleshooter for the Outer Planets League (OPL) in the run-up to what may become the first interplanetary war.
     
  • Big Sky Country: Brant Halvar is a skyracer on the dangerous skyracing circuit. He and his crew overcome adversity as he advances through the ranks in his effort to be accepted into the elite Big Sky League.
     
  • Pageeda and Scuffee: Pageeda, a young homeless girl living in a gritty port city, struggles to find out what happened to her older sister. She is befriended by Scuffee, a strangely intelligent, oversized cat who has escaped from the local Arena.
     
  • Roadwerks Limited: Rocco Fitch, a wounded veteran of the war in Afghanistan, inadvertently buys a magic road…and gets far more than he bargained for.
     
  • The Royal Bodyguard: Lydio Malik is the Royal Bodyguard for Princess Analisa, the heir to the throne of Salasia. He and a team of others defend her from powerful forces trying to topple the ruling dynasty.
     

Three of these series, Big Sky country, Pageeda and Scuffee, and The Royal Bodyguard are all part of a larger canvas known as The Thousand Kingdoms.

Now, each of these series has a story arc for the “first season,” an arc that I expect to be able to fit into a reasonably-sized book, much the same way that Wool slotted together nicely as novel. Generally, what I’ve envisioned is a five-part arc for each season. And, thus, in way, what I have is a whole bunch of pilots.

So, I’m actually working on a bunch of novels at the same time. Part-time (since I still have a day job). And it all stays fresh for me, because I’m working on multiple projects at a time.

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